Recipes

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Matt Cavanaugh
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Recipes

#1

Post by Matt Cavanaugh » Wed Mar 16, 2016 10:10 am

A place to share recipes without bogging down the Undead Thread.

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Re: Recipes

#2

Post by Matt Cavanaugh » Wed Mar 16, 2016 10:13 am

Corned Beef and Cabbage

INGREDIENTS
2 lbs Onions
2.5 lbs Carrots
3 lbs Cabbage
2.5 lbs Small Red Potatoes

6 lb Corned Beef

1 C Malt Vinegar
12 oz Stout
1 tbs Mustard Seed
1 tbs Coriander Seed
1/2 tbs Black Peppercorns
1/3 Tbs Dill Seed
1/2 Tbs Allspice (whole)
2 Bay leaves
2/3 C Quality Mustard
14- 20 qt "lobster" pot

PREPARATION
Coarsely chop 1 Cup onions & 1 Cup carrots. Place chopped onions & carrots in pot, along with the corned beef & its liquid, plus vinegar, stout, & spices (including the spice packet which often accompanies the meat). Add water to barely cover beef.

Cover pot and bring to a boil (20 - 25 minutes.) Reduce heat and simmer until meat is tender when pierced (2 1/2 - 3 hours). The vegetables will be added to the pot as outlined below.

Cut remaining onions into wedges. Cut carrots into 2" lengths, halving lengthwise if thick. Cut Cabbages in half, remove cores, then cut into large wedges. Scrub the potatoes, cutting in half if large.

When beef is nearly done, add the onions, carrots & potatoes. When these are nearly done, add the cabbage on top. Continue cooking until cabbage is very tender (15 - 20 minutes).

SERVING
With a slotted spoon, transfer vegetables to a large serving platter or bowl. Place meat on a cutting board and slice into long, thing pieces across the grain. Transfer to a serving platter. Serve with mustard. Serves 12.

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Re: Recipes

#3

Post by Matt Cavanaugh » Wed Mar 16, 2016 10:15 am

Colcannon

INGREDIENTS
4 lb Russet Potatoes
1 lb Cabbage, cut into fine shreds
1/2 C Butter
1 1/4 C Milk
1 C Green Onions, Sliced

Salt & Pepper to taste

5 -6 quart pan with cover, 3 -4 quart sauce pan


PREPARATION

Peel potatoes, cut into 2" pieces & boil until tender. Drain & mash. Set aside in a large serving bowl.

On low heat, melt butter in pan then add cabbage. Cover, steam over medium heat until wilted (8 - 15 minutes) stirring often so as not to brown.

Meanwhile, place milk into a sauce pan, add green onions, and simmer 8 - 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

Blend milk mixture into mashed potatoes. Mix cabbage into mashed potatoes. Season with salt & pepper & serve immediately. Serves 12.

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Re: Recipes

#4

Post by feathers » Thu Mar 17, 2016 3:07 am

Matt Cavanaugh wrote:Corned Beef and Cabbage

INGREDIENTS
2 lbs Onions
2.5 lbs Carrots
3 lbs Cabbage
2.5 lbs Small Red Potatoes

6 lb Corned Beef

1 C Malt Vinegar
12 oz Stout
1 tbs Mustard Seed
1 tbs Coriander Seed
1/2 tbs Black Peppercorns
1/3 Tbs Dill Seed
1/2 Tbs Allspice (whole)
2 Bay leaves
2/3 C Quality Mustard
14- 20 qt "lobster" pot
Imperialist!

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Re: Recipes

#5

Post by comhcinc » Thu Mar 17, 2016 1:13 pm

Comhcinc's Famous Chicken Stew. This is something I though everyone knew of but lately I have found it's not the case.

1 whole chicken. A short cut is to get a cold rotisserie chicken from the deli section (which is what I do most of the time)
boil the chicken and save the water and let it reduce.
Once the chicken is cool enough to handle using your hands, strip every piece of meat off of that you can. Throw that in to the pot with the reduced boil water*

4 cups chicken broth
V8 or tomato juice 4 cups

6 ears of corn (or about three cans)

Large onion cut to your desired size

6 large potatoes (or you know more if using like small red potatoes) chopped like you want

6 celerity sticks again chopped to the size you want.

3 tablespoons of hot sauce


All that in a pot and cook till the potatoes are soft at least but if you let it go for at least two hours it taste better. Serve with saltine crackers. Being a stew you can add any fresh vegetables you want but this is the basic. I often add kale or a fresh bean in the summer. This same basic recipe is also used to make goat stew.

*if you didn't boil the chicken put all the wet ingredients in first and then add water this stew should be really soupy.

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Re: Recipes

#6

Post by screwtape » Fri Apr 08, 2016 11:50 am

Cornish Pasties

A traditional dish, convenient for carrying with you down the local tin mine. These ones use hot water crust pastry, which is more structurally sound than short crust pastry.

Filling.
First a vegetarian version. Peel and slice one potato and three carrots. Fry in hot olive oil until beginning to soften. Add one finely chopped onion and one packet of Yves Veggie Ground Round (the Mexican version is good for this). Add 1/2 cup of red wine to deglaze the bottom of the pan and allow to thicken slightly. Set aside for filling the pastry.

A traditional Cornish pasty contains beef, onion, and turnip (swede if in Cornwall) and he strongly flavored with pepper. Lots of variations are possible. You can cook this filling in a frying pan as with the vegetarian version, or you can place it uncooked into the pastry and simply bake for longer.

Pastry
Hot water crust pastry is very easy to make and fun to work with. I used 2 cups of white bread flour, 1/2 teaspoon of salt mixed in a bowl. Take 100ml of cold water and place in a small pan. Add 4 ounces of fat, with large being the traditional ingredient and which seems to work the best. Vegetable shortening can certainly be used instead. Heat the pan until the water boils and the fat melts. Pour this while boiling hot onto the flour and salt, and mix with a fork. You may need to add some more hot water up to the point at which the dough will stick together when pressed between the fingers. Allow this to cool a little if it is too hot to handle, but if your hands are comfortable with the temperature it's okay to place it on your work surface and start kneading. You will need very little flour for this, as the dough is a bit greasy and does not tend to stick to things. Unlike short crust pastry, this kind of benefits from being handled. Knead it until it is consistent and soft. It should resemble Play-Doh in texture and elasticity. Roll it out to 1/4 inch thickness and cut into 6 - 8 inch circles - I use the lid of a metal biscuit tin as a cutter. Hot water crust pastry can be used for other purposes, and is especially useful for raised pies; the Play-Doh like quality of the pastry allows you to form it around a mold. It is best known for its use in game pies and traditional English pork pies, where a gelatin broth is poured into the pie after cooking (leave a hole in the lid) and allowed to set.

Build the pasties
There are two ways of doing this. You can hold the circle of dough in the palm of your left hand, place about 1 1/2 dessert spoons of filling in the center of the circle and then fold the edges up, pinching them together in a ridge. Having a cup of water at hand to wet the edges will help them stick. The other design is achieved by leaving the circle of dough on a flat surface, adding the filling into one side, then folding the other side of the circle over the top of the filling and again pinching and sealing the edge. If you have an egg to spare, this can be beaten and painted onto the pastry which will give it a glossy surface.

Bake
Place the pasties onto a greased baking tray (or one with a silicone mat) and put into a preheated 350° oven for 45 minutes in the case of the vegetarian filling, but for 50 to 60 minutes for the meat filling. My preference would be to pre-cook the meat filling to be certain to avoid serving undercooked meat. Allow to cool a bit before serving.

These will keep in the fridge and can be re-warmed and can be frozen (but be careful as the pastry may crack). The two different designs can be seen in this photograph:
P3100135-1.jpg
(361.01 KiB) Downloaded 251 times

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Re: Recipes

#7

Post by Old_ones » Fri Apr 08, 2016 1:29 pm

screwtape wrote:Cornish Pasties

A traditional dish, convenient for carrying with you down the local tin mine. These ones use hot water crust pastry, which is more structurally sound than short crust pastry.

Filling.
First a vegetarian version. Peel and slice one potato and three carrots. Fry in hot olive oil until beginning to soften. Add one finely chopped onion and one packet of Yves Veggie Ground Round (the Mexican version is good for this). Add 1/2 cup of red wine to deglaze the bottom of the pan and allow to thicken slightly. Set aside for filling the pastry.

A traditional Cornish pasty contains beef, onion, and turnip (swede if in Cornwall) and he strongly flavored with pepper. Lots of variations are possible. You can cook this filling in a frying pan as with the vegetarian version, or you can place it uncooked into the pastry and simply bake for longer.

Pastry
Hot water crust pastry is very easy to make and fun to work with. I used 2 cups of white bread flour, 1/2 teaspoon of salt mixed in a bowl. Take 100ml of cold water and place in a small pan. Add 4 ounces of fat, with large being the traditional ingredient and which seems to work the best. Vegetable shortening can certainly be used instead. Heat the pan until the water boils and the fat melts. Pour this while boiling hot onto the flour and salt, and mix with a fork. You may need to add some more hot water up to the point at which the dough will stick together when pressed between the fingers. Allow this to cool a little if it is too hot to handle, but if your hands are comfortable with the temperature it's okay to place it on your work surface and start kneading. You will need very little flour for this, as the dough is a bit greasy and does not tend to stick to things. Unlike short crust pastry, this kind of benefits from being handled. Knead it until it is consistent and soft. It should resemble Play-Doh in texture and elasticity. Roll it out to 1/4 inch thickness and cut into 6 - 8 inch circles - I use the lid of a metal biscuit tin as a cutter. Hot water crust pastry can be used for other purposes, and is especially useful for raised pies; the Play-Doh like quality of the pastry allows you to form it around a mold. It is best known for its use in game pies and traditional English pork pies, where a gelatin broth is poured into the pie after cooking (leave a hole in the lid) and allowed to set.

Build the pasties
There are two ways of doing this. You can hold the circle of dough in the palm of your left hand, place about 1 1/2 dessert spoons of filling in the center of the circle and then fold the edges up, pinching them together in a ridge. Having a cup of water at hand to wet the edges will help them stick. The other design is achieved by leaving the circle of dough on a flat surface, adding the filling into one side, then folding the other side of the circle over the top of the filling and again pinching and sealing the edge. If you have an egg to spare, this can be beaten and painted onto the pastry which will give it a glossy surface.

Bake
Place the pasties onto a greased baking tray (or one with a silicone mat) and put into a preheated 350° oven for 45 minutes in the case of the vegetarian filling, but for 50 to 60 minutes for the meat filling. My preference would be to pre-cook the meat filling to be certain to avoid serving undercooked meat. Allow to cool a bit before serving.

These will keep in the fridge and can be re-warmed and can be frozen (but be careful as the pastry may crack). The two different designs can be seen in this photograph:
P3100135-1.jpg
Amazing. Thanks for this. Coincidentally, Cornish pasties are exactly the dish I was planning to construct with the pastry. Pasties are popular in the upper peninsula of Michigan, because a lot of people came to the copper mines from Cornwall, and they brought these with them. I've wanted to make my own ever since my first trip up there.

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Re: Recipes

#8

Post by Matt Cavanaugh » Fri Apr 08, 2016 4:28 pm

Old_ones wrote:
screwtape wrote:Cornish Pasties

A traditional dish, convenient for carrying with you down the local tin mine. These ones use hot water crust pastry, which is more structurally sound than short crust pastry.

Filling.
First a vegetarian version. Peel and slice one potato and three carrots. Fry in hot olive oil until beginning to soften. Add one finely chopped onion and one packet of Yves Veggie Ground Round (the Mexican version is good for this). Add 1/2 cup of red wine to deglaze the bottom of the pan and allow to thicken slightly. Set aside for filling the pastry.

A traditional Cornish pasty contains beef, onion, and turnip (swede if in Cornwall) and he strongly flavored with pepper. Lots of variations are possible. You can cook this filling in a frying pan as with the vegetarian version, or you can place it uncooked into the pastry and simply bake for longer.

Pastry
Hot water crust pastry is very easy to make and fun to work with. I used 2 cups of white bread flour, 1/2 teaspoon of salt mixed in a bowl. Take 100ml of cold water and place in a small pan. Add 4 ounces of fat, with large being the traditional ingredient and which seems to work the best. Vegetable shortening can certainly be used instead. Heat the pan until the water boils and the fat melts. Pour this while boiling hot onto the flour and salt, and mix with a fork. You may need to add some more hot water up to the point at which the dough will stick together when pressed between the fingers. Allow this to cool a little if it is too hot to handle, but if your hands are comfortable with the temperature it's okay to place it on your work surface and start kneading. You will need very little flour for this, as the dough is a bit greasy and does not tend to stick to things. Unlike short crust pastry, this kind of benefits from being handled. Knead it until it is consistent and soft. It should resemble Play-Doh in texture and elasticity. Roll it out to 1/4 inch thickness and cut into 6 - 8 inch circles - I use the lid of a metal biscuit tin as a cutter. Hot water crust pastry can be used for other purposes, and is especially useful for raised pies; the Play-Doh like quality of the pastry allows you to form it around a mold. It is best known for its use in game pies and traditional English pork pies, where a gelatin broth is poured into the pie after cooking (leave a hole in the lid) and allowed to set.

Build the pasties
There are two ways of doing this. You can hold the circle of dough in the palm of your left hand, place about 1 1/2 dessert spoons of filling in the center of the circle and then fold the edges up, pinching them together in a ridge. Having a cup of water at hand to wet the edges will help them stick. The other design is achieved by leaving the circle of dough on a flat surface, adding the filling into one side, then folding the other side of the circle over the top of the filling and again pinching and sealing the edge. If you have an egg to spare, this can be beaten and painted onto the pastry which will give it a glossy surface.

Bake
Place the pasties onto a greased baking tray (or one with a silicone mat) and put into a preheated 350° oven for 45 minutes in the case of the vegetarian filling, but for 50 to 60 minutes for the meat filling. My preference would be to pre-cook the meat filling to be certain to avoid serving undercooked meat. Allow to cool a bit before serving.

These will keep in the fridge and can be re-warmed and can be frozen (but be careful as the pastry may crack). The two different designs can be seen in this photograph:
P3100135-1.jpg
Amazing. Thanks for this. Coincidentally, Cornish pasties are exactly the dish I was planning to construct with the pastry. Pasties are popular in the upper peninsula of Michigan, because a lot of people came to the copper mines from Cornwall, and they brought these with them. I've wanted to make my own ever since my first trip up there.
Cornish pasties are also traditional here in the Sierra Foothills, where "Cousin Jacks" settled to work in the gold mines. The best-made ones are a treat. Always my choice for dinner at our County Fair.

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Re: Recipes

#9

Post by Old_ones » Fri Apr 08, 2016 8:45 pm

This youtube channel is courtesy of Screwtape, and IMO it's worth its weight in gold.


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Re: Recipes

#10

Post by Old_ones » Fri Apr 08, 2016 9:41 pm

Southeastern Michigan Cultural Appropriation Kebab.

This is a take on a Syrian recipe for lamb kafta, which is appropriate given the number of middle eastern residents with whom I share my home region. I didn't make this recipe up, it was adapted from a cookbook I recieved as a gift, called "The Golden Rules of Spices". I am cooking the kafta on a stove-top like a burger (this is the most convenient way for me as an apartment dweller), and sauteing the veggies as an acompanyment. I have also tried grilling the meat and vegetables and this works just as well. The way I usually make the spice mix listed below is to measure out whole spices in the proportions given, and then grind in a coffee grinder. Having said that, I've used powdered variants of one or more of the spices (including clove powder) to no ill effect. Galanga is a fairly uncommon spice which is closely related to ginger. I have prepared powdered galanga for this recipe before by finding the frozen root at an asian grocery, drying and grinding in a coffee grinder. The spice mix used in this recipe is amazing and can be easily translated to other dishes. Without further adieu:

Start with :

1 lb ground lamb

½ cup mozzarella (grated) [if you can find it, Armenian string cheese is better, but don’t kill yourself looking for it]

¼ cup white onion (grated)

2 tsp spice mix (make this mix by combining: 2 tbsp allspice, 1 tsp cinnamon, 2 tsp nutmeg, 1 tsp green cardamom, ½ Tsp galanga, ½ tsp cloves, 2 tbsp black pepper, ½ tsp dried ginger)

Coarsely chopped white onion, tomato, and green bell pepper (for accompaniment)

Preparation:

Prepare the grated cheese and grated onion, then add to lamb along with spices and mix until homogeneous by folding with a spatula or kneading (or whatever your preferred method is)

Set aside in a covered bowl and allow lamb mixture to sit in the refrigerator for 1 hour

Form the lamb mixture into 4 patties. Coat each side of each patty with kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper, and and allow to come to room temperature over ~15 min or so. Fry in a cast iron pan coated with olive oil and ~ 1 tbsp butter. The frying should be done at medium heat; the patties get roughly 6 min per side. While I usually cook my meats to medium rare or rare, you want this to be cooked through

After the patties have been removed, rest them for 10 min on a plate under foil

Saute the coarsely chopped vegetables in the meat drippings and grease until the tomatoes become tender
Peppers and onions should be softened, but retain some resilience

Serve on rice pilaf or pita

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Re: Recipes

#11

Post by Old_ones » Sat Apr 09, 2016 11:23 pm

screwtape wrote:Cornish Pasties

A traditional dish, convenient for carrying with you down the local tin mine. These ones use hot water crust pastry, which is more structurally sound than short crust pastry.

Filling.
First a vegetarian version. Peel and slice one potato and three carrots. Fry in hot olive oil until beginning to soften. Add one finely chopped onion and one packet of Yves Veggie Ground Round (the Mexican version is good for this). Add 1/2 cup of red wine to deglaze the bottom of the pan and allow to thicken slightly. Set aside for filling the pastry.

A traditional Cornish pasty contains beef, onion, and turnip (swede if in Cornwall) and he strongly flavored with pepper. Lots of variations are possible. You can cook this filling in a frying pan as with the vegetarian version, or you can place it uncooked into the pastry and simply bake for longer.

Pastry
Hot water crust pastry is very easy to make and fun to work with. I used 2 cups of white bread flour, 1/2 teaspoon of salt mixed in a bowl. Take 100ml of cold water and place in a small pan. Add 4 ounces of fat, with large being the traditional ingredient and which seems to work the best. Vegetable shortening can certainly be used instead. Heat the pan until the water boils and the fat melts. Pour this while boiling hot onto the flour and salt, and mix with a fork. You may need to add some more hot water up to the point at which the dough will stick together when pressed between the fingers. Allow this to cool a little if it is too hot to handle, but if your hands are comfortable with the temperature it's okay to place it on your work surface and start kneading. You will need very little flour for this, as the dough is a bit greasy and does not tend to stick to things. Unlike short crust pastry, this kind of benefits from being handled. Knead it until it is consistent and soft. It should resemble Play-Doh in texture and elasticity. Roll it out to 1/4 inch thickness and cut into 6 - 8 inch circles - I use the lid of a metal biscuit tin as a cutter. Hot water crust pastry can be used for other purposes, and is especially useful for raised pies; the Play-Doh like quality of the pastry allows you to form it around a mold. It is best known for its use in game pies and traditional English pork pies, where a gelatin broth is poured into the pie after cooking (leave a hole in the lid) and allowed to set.

Build the pasties
There are two ways of doing this. You can hold the circle of dough in the palm of your left hand, place about 1 1/2 dessert spoons of filling in the center of the circle and then fold the edges up, pinching them together in a ridge. Having a cup of water at hand to wet the edges will help them stick. The other design is achieved by leaving the circle of dough on a flat surface, adding the filling into one side, then folding the other side of the circle over the top of the filling and again pinching and sealing the edge. If you have an egg to spare, this can be beaten and painted onto the pastry which will give it a glossy surface.

Bake
Place the pasties onto a greased baking tray (or one with a silicone mat) and put into a preheated 350° oven for 45 minutes in the case of the vegetarian filling, but for 50 to 60 minutes for the meat filling. My preference would be to pre-cook the meat filling to be certain to avoid serving undercooked meat. Allow to cool a bit before serving.

These will keep in the fridge and can be re-warmed and can be frozen (but be careful as the pastry may crack). The two different designs can be seen in this photograph:
P3100135-1.jpg
I tried a variation on this (mostly the filling was varied) and I have a verdict. My filling was beef based, and the first part of the critique is that if you are making a beef based filling be sure to season it well. I added salt and pepper, used carrots potatoes onions and beef, and I didn't add enough seasoning. The carrots and potatoes were boiled in salt water, and salt and pepper were added to the beef after browning it, but I could have used a bit more. Make sure the filling is not bland, because it accounts for most of the flavor of the dish.

Secondly, the quality of the pastry was great. Its a bit stiff and has good flavor for a pasty (I used 100% lard for the pastry). I only had enough pastry for 4 pasties (with about 1/2 pasty excess) with the measures specified above though, so if you want to make a big batch consider doubling the recipe or scaling it by 1.5x, otherwise you don't need more than about 1.5 cups filling. You can also get away with rolling this pretty thin (mine were rolled to about 1/8 in but that might actually have been thicker than necessary) because it is a stiff, robust pastry. A circle diameter greater than 8 in could also probably be used if you want to get more filling into each pie. You may want to cook a little longer if you do that.

Overall, great recipe. Will use in the future.

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Jamaican Rice and Peas the easy way

#12

Post by screwtape » Tue May 31, 2016 6:48 am

Here you go. Foolproof cookery that tastes great. Jamaican rice and peas (traditionally pigeon peas, but any bean will do) in a rice cooker.

Using the cup measure that comes with your rice cooker, which is about 2/3 of a measuring cup:

3 cups brown or white rice (just remember to use the appropriate scale on the side when topping up with liquid as brown rice needs more liquid)
1 cup canned beans (you can use dry beans, but you must cook them first)
1 cup coconut milk
1 chopped shallot/scallion/spring onion
1 tsp ground thyme
1/4 tsp allspice
a few drops of your favourite hot pepper sauce (I recommend 'Fear Itself') if you can find it for its extraordinary sweetness
salt and black pepper to taste

Wash your rice and place in cooker, then add the beans, chopped scallion, coconut milk and spices. Top up with water to the appropriate mark, treating the cup of beans as if it was rice, ie fill to the four cup mark. If you like, use vegetable or chicken stock instead of water, but add less salt if you do as there is usually plenty in a stock cube. You can use more beans if you want, just fill the cooker with liquid to the total number of cups or rice and beans combined. Stir it up and switch on. Stir again halfway through the cooking process, and before serving. To serve, spoon out and garnish with some green chopped scallion tips. You can eat this by itself, or with some extra protein such as fried chicken, pulled pork, or crispy-fried tofu. I make my own soy milk, so I turned a batch into tofu for this and my weed-eating vegetarian wife was entirely happy.

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Re: Recipes

#13

Post by screwtape » Sun Dec 10, 2017 10:03 am

This one is winning some accolades in the household, and seems to be worth spreading around. There are all sorts of variations on the original Egg Benedict, but this goes a step further. The side dish is nice enough to consider using in other situations too.

Smoked Salmon and Rosti Eggs Benedict
Ingredients:
2 large potatoes
3 TBSP butter
2-3 TBSP milk
salt and pepper
4 Eggs
Smoked salmon, four slices
Hollandaise Sauce mix, needs some butter and milk (Yay! Cheating!)

Rosti is a Swiss dish, where grated potatoes are fried into cakes, and we shall use those fried potato cakes instead of toasted English muffins. There's argument about whether to grate them raw, or parboil them and then grate them. Some people leave them for a day in the fridge, occasionally sprinkled with salt to draw out water. I've made them both ways, and this seems to work the best to me. So, to begin - pick a couple of large potatoes. Wash them if still covered in soil, but do not peel. Cut them in half, but not into small pieces, and drop into boiling water for ten minutes only. Pour off the boiling water and add cold water and let them cool. When cold, the skins should peel off with just a little pressure of thumb and fingers. Using the coarse side of a grater, grate them into a bowl and put aside until ready to cook. There are several things to juggle here, but when you think it is time, put a good chunk (~3 TBSP) butter in a non-stick frying pan and melt it on high heat. Add the potatoes and press them into a cake that fills the pan. Add a couple of tablespoons of whole milk drizzled over it, a sprinkle of salt and black pepper. Cover with a lid and cook on med-high heat for 20 minutes, without stirring or looking. After that, use a plate to cover the pan, invert it so the half-cooked potato cake falls out. Then slide it off the plate back into the pan so the other side can cook, which is likely to be another 15 minutes. For those who care, we are cooking the parboiled shreds of potato the rest of the way with steam released from those shreds that are in contact with the frying pan, while also browning and making the bits in contact with the pan a bit crunchy. This is a nice problem, lots of heat gives the crunch, but may not give enough time for the middle to steam cook. Less heat and longer time might allow the middle to cook, but the outside isn't crunchy. A further constraint is that we want the middle of the cake to be cooked, but to retain some texture rather than becoming homogeneous potato mush. I am afraid exact times will depend on your pan, your stove, and the strain of potato used. Worse still, you have to make Hollandaise sauce and poach eggs while all this is going on! When all is ready, cut the rosti into quarters and serve.

On top of the rosti will go some smoked salmon, and I don't need to say a thing about that. But on top of the smoked salmon goes one or two poached eggs, and they are an art unto themselves. A poached egg is an egg boiled without a shell, and it is also a guaranteed disaster unless you know exactly what you are doing. Yes, you can buy an egg-poacher, but you don't get a poached egg from those; you get an egg fried in a hemispherical container. We want the real thing, which is an egg uncontaminated with oil or butter, the only fat being that which is in the yolk. The difficulty comes with adding the egg to boiling water without it all fragmenting into tiny bits of coagulated protein. Most people know that acid speeds coagulation, and vinegar (say, 3 TBSP) is added to the water for this. My technique goes like this: You need a depth of 3" of boiling water, in a pan big enough that all the eggs have their own (safe) space. Boil it. Take it off the heat to add the eggs as there must be no agitation at this time. To add the eggs, they must be cracked into deeply cupped spoons in advance (cooking time is three minutes, so you can't be farting around cracking, pouring and introducing or the first egg will be cooked before the fourth has been cracked. Dip the spoon into the water, pause to let it heat, then sink it gently to the bottom of the pan, and gently tilt it so the egg, which we hope has a skin of coagulated albumen by this point, slides out into the bottom of the pan without fragmenting into strands and tendrils of coagulated egg white. Being gentle and deliberate is the key. Repeat for the other eggs. Put the pan back on the heat, but don't let it boil more than a few large lazy bubbles as vigorous bubbling will result in a pan full of tiny bits of egg white. You can do it, but you might want to practice. You can get deep cups that clip onto the side of the pan that simulate this process by coddling the egg, and the result will taste much the same as long as they are not oiled to prevent sticking. Sadly, it is the oil that makes it a fried egg, and there's a huge difference between the tase of a fried egg and a poached egg, so if you use such devices, be prepared to clean the stuck egg off the poaching cup. Better by far to learn how to let your eggs develop freely! (Good Lord, I never meant this have so many double entendres!) It is possible also to poach the eggs halfway in advance, keep them in the fridge until ready, and reheat them in boiling water. If you do this, you will have overcooked eggs, I promise. Yolks like bullets. Better try to organise yourself so that all parts reach their culmination simultaneously, since this is what most cooking is actually about - time discipline and planning ahead. So when your eggs have had three minutes in water that is kinda-rather-sorta-thinking-about-boiling (like the 'seven lazy goldfish' kind of boil used in China for making green tea), scoop them out with a slotted spoon and place on top of the smoked salmon. Then you pour on a couple of tablespoons of Hollandaise sauce. I can tell you how to make that sauce, but to be honest, if I am to have any hope at all that anyone will try to do this I am going to have to recommend cheating for this bit as there a lot of stuff to do at once, and to make it all happen so that everything comes together at the once in the end is a lot to ask. Buy a packet of Hollandaise sauce mix, melt some butter in a pan, whisk in the mix with a fork, and slowly add the recommended amount of milk, whisking all the while. If you go slowly, there will be no lumps. Put it back on the heat and keep stirring vigorously until thick, at which point you can take it off the heat, to be reheated now and then until everything else is ready.

Sweet and Sour Cabbage with Bacon
Ingredients:
Four rashers bacon, or fake bacon equivalent
1 medium or half a large cabbage, chopped
One onion, chopped small
Two Granny Smith apples, peeled and chopped coarsely
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup cider vinegar
3 TBSP soy sauce
Mmmm—bacon! Got you already! This is easy, and fortunately not terribly time-sensitive. Cabbages come in all sorts of sizes, so the best I can say is to use a whole small green* cabbage, or half of a large one. You will need a large wok, with smoking hot oil in it. Chop up a few rashers of bacon, or a few slices of fake bacon if you have the impediment of a vegetarian spouse and fry them till a little crispy. Remove from the pan and reserve on some kitchen paper. Add the cabbage to the hot frying pan, chopped small and cook with frequent stirring until it wilts, taking about 10 minutes. At this point add a chopped onion, and a couple of peeled and chopped Granny Smith apples, 1/4 cup sugar, 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar. and 3 TBSP soy sauce. stir and cook for ten more minutes, then add back the fried bacon and it's ready to go.
*red cabbage? Go for it!

Advice on Timing
Obviously we are going to prepare whatever we can in advance. Parboil, cool, peel and grate the potatoes.The sweet and sour cabbage can be be made and finished before starting anything else. It's nice if the cabbage still has some crunch, but it does keep for the next day when it will be a bit less 'toothy'. So make that first and set to the side. Start the grated potatoes cooking. Have a pan of water boiled for the eggs. Make the sauce and take it off the heat: it can go back onto a ring and be stirred a few times whenever the chance arises during the rest of the process. Once the cabbage is cooked and waiting, the rosti is cooked and waiting, the sauce is cooked and waiting, then add the eggs to the boiled water and cook them. Don't forget to heat the plates upon which this will all be served.
Frankly, more than one pair of hands would be helpful with this dish. Asking your partner to stir the sauce, the cabbage in its wok, to heat the plates etc etc can make it much more practicable, and it always wins brownie points when you accept help from someone.

And When to Serve?
Eggs Benedict are definitely a breakfast dish. Cabbage? Not so much. I suspect the best possible answer is to serve this as a brunch. Should you have cast aside all expectations about which foods when, you can have it for dinner too.

The combination of potatoes, fried to crunchy perfection on the outside and steamed on the inside, with smoked salmon, poached egg and buttery Hollandaise Sauce, along with smoky cabbage, apple and bacon is rather good. You can make the cabbage side dish a time or two and serve it in other settings. You can make rosti a few times until you feel comfy with it. Most of all, you can practice poaching eggs until it is something you can do with one hand tied behind your back. Once you have all those ducks all lined up, go for it and make the brunch of kings!

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Re: Recipes

#14

Post by free thoughtpolice » Sun Dec 10, 2017 1:20 pm

Easy everyday breakfast:
Preheat wok at low medium heat.
Place sliced English Muffin, extra crispy or sourdough in toaster oven
Finely chop 1 1/2 tbsp garlic and 1 1/2 tbsp green onion and add it to the wok with olive oil and butter when muffin has toasted for 10 min.
After about 30 seconds add 2 extra large eggs, 3 tbsp water (to steam the eggs) and place lid over top
In 3-5 min. when egg yolk is no longer watery, remove from heat, place an egg on each half of buttered muffin, salt lightly and top with generous amount of sriracha sauce

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Re: Recipes

#15

Post by screwtape » Sat Feb 17, 2018 9:27 am

Tortas de Aceite

I don't know if these delicious olive oil biscuits/cookies ever came across to the Spanish-influenced culture of the southern US, having first met them in Andalusia. Sugary, flaky and aniseed flavoured. Delicious with an aperitif, perhaps as the last bite of your tapas. They are also easy to make, if a little labour intensive. It is worth the effort, and what you make will be better than the commercial brands like Ines Rosales.

In readiness:
-Preheat the oven to 450ºF.
-Lightly grease two baking trays, or use silicone baking sheets like a sensible person.
-Sprinkle sugar evenly over the baking sheets (use a sifter if you have one).

Dry:
-Mix 1½ cups all-purpose or cake flour with 1 tsp salt and 2 tsp aniseed (This can be fennel seeds, or ground-up star anise, which is better).

Wet:
-Mix 2/3 cup warm water, 1/3 cup olive oil, 3 TBSP sugar and 2 tsp dried yeast. Keep the mixture warm and stir occasionally until it is getting foamy as the yeast activates. Don't wait too long - you want some of the CO2 available later to inflate the layers of the final biscuit.
-Separate an egg and whisk the white, keeping it for later.

Mix:
-Pour the liquid into a well in the dry ingredients and mix together.
-Turn out onto a floured surface and divide into twelve balls of dough.
-Using as much extra flour as required (the oily dough will need at least a generous pinch for each ball) flatten and roll them into rounds about 1/8 to 1/4" thick.
-Place each onto the sugar-sifted baking sheet and press gently so as to impress the sugar into the underside.
-Brush the upper side with the whisked egg white
-Sprinkle on more sugar

Bake:
- bake for 6-12 minutes at 450ºF. My oven with both trays on the top shelf effectively blocking air circulation takes all 12 minutes. Yours might be quicker. All that sugar means that when they burn they do so suddenly. The first time you do it set a timer for six minutes and have a look. Then look every two minutes. You want a bit of browning on the top, but not overmuch around the edges. When done place on racks to cool.

Serve:
Nibble with café con leche, a glass of sherry or indulge your pan-Mediterrannean instincts with a Campari-soda, or even any anisado/anisette/anis/pastis etc etc
IMG_0263.jpg
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Re: Recipes

#16

Post by MarcusAu » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:54 pm

Matt Cavanaugh wrote: Corned Beef and Cabbage

...
Makes me think of Jiggs and Maggie (supposedly based on Grace Kelly's father)

https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4045/44 ... 3733_o.jpg

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Re: Recipes

#17

Post by MarcusAu » Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:06 pm

Traditional New Zealand Pukeko Soup

http://www.tiritirimatangi.org.nz/image ... ukeko2.jpg

Ingredients:

1 pukeko

2 medium size stones.

Add all ingredients to a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring slowly to the boil and gently simmer for three to four days. At the end of this time throw away the pukeko and eat the stones.

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Re: Recipes

#18

Post by free thoughtpolice » Sat Mar 31, 2018 7:45 pm

Potatoes for low carb diets:
Russets have the most starch, Tukon Gold the least.
Take the Yukon Golds, slice them into 3/4 inch slices and soak them in cold water for a few hours. Drain, effectively removing significant starch.
Blanch by boiling for several minutes.
You now have a slightly? somewhat? less starchy potato that makes crisp hash browns, or an addition to any number of dishes.
Greek potato salad anyone ? :drool:

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Re: Recipes

#19

Post by MarcusAu » Sun Apr 01, 2018 10:45 am

free thoughtpolice wrote: Potatoes for low carb diets:
Russets have the most starch, Tukon Gold the least.
Take the Yukon Golds, slice them into 3/4 inch slices and soak them in cold water for a few hours. Drain, effectively removing significant starch.
Blanch by boiling for several minutes.
You now have a slightly? somewhat? less starchy potato that makes crisp hash browns, or an addition to any number of dishes.
Greek potato salad anyone ? :drool:
And you can use the leftovers to make transparent potato chips:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPf5ShDp7ak

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Re: Recipes

#20

Post by free thoughtpolice » Sat Apr 14, 2018 3:16 pm

Roast sweet Potato chunks.
Glaze:
2/3 cup of olive oil
1 tbsp fresh oregano
1 tbsp fresh thyme
4 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 tbsp sriracha sauce
1 tbsp soya sauce
Allow the glaze to steep in the cup for 2 or more hours
Chop 2 pounds of sweet potato (I don't bother peeling, just clean well) in 3/4 inch cubes
Place sweet potatoes in large ziploc bag, and pour glaze in, rotate and mash glaze on to the cubes
Put foil on baking pan and glazed sp chunks one layer deep on foil, drizzle any excess glaze in bag on chunks.
Set 2 inches or so under broiler element at 450 F
10-12 min for al dente, 15 minutes for tender

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Re: Recipes

#21

Post by free thoughtpolice » Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:52 pm

free thoughtpolice wrote: Easy everyday breakfast:
Preheat wok at low medium heat.
Place sliced English Muffin, extra crispy or sourdough in toaster oven
Finely chop 1 1/2 tbsp garlic and 1 1/2 tbsp green onion and add it to the wok with olive oil and butter when muffin has toasted for 10 min.
After about 30 seconds add 2 extra large eggs, 3 tbsp water (to steam the eggs) and place lid over top
In 3-5 min. when egg yolk is no longer watery, remove from heat, place an egg on each half of buttered muffin, salt lightly and top with generous amount of sriracha sauce
That is an excellent recipe FTP! But I have an even better idea.
Me: OK voice in my head, tell me, I'm open minded.
VIMH:
Preheat wok.
Take one large mushrooms and dice into 1/4 inch cubes, add to olive oil and butter
Take a 100% whole wheat English Muffin and set to toast for 10 minutes
Dice 3 large garlic cloves and add to wok at 10 minutes, blend with the shroom butter
Add the 2 extra large eggs, 3 tbsp water and cover with lid. Should be ready 3-5 minutes, salt and sriracha.
Like the green onion version, but use more butter

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Re: Recipes

#22

Post by free thoughtpolice » Fri Oct 05, 2018 10:52 am


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Re: Recipes

#23

Post by Keating » Sun Oct 07, 2018 10:24 pm

These are amazing with ice cream and strawberries:

https://www.haighschocolates.com.au/rec ... -fondants/

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Re: Recipes

#24

Post by free thoughtpolice » Wed Oct 10, 2018 5:34 pm

Slymepit Pommes de Terror Dauphin.
Boil 1 pound of Yellow Potatoes, Yukon Gold or German Butter. I leave the skin on.
While they are cooking do a stir fry of:
1 cup of finely cubed mushrooms
4 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
3/4 cup of chopped scallions
Mash the potatoes and mix in the stirfry
Add 3 tbsp sourcream, maybe with some fresh herbs
Fry patties of that mix in the super hot oil you have ready until crispy brown on each side.

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Re: Recipes

#25

Post by MarcusAu » Thu Oct 11, 2018 1:26 am

Most folks call them green onions, but they are really scallions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBph8e8JlG8

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Re: Recipes

#26

Post by free thoughtpolice » Thu Oct 18, 2018 5:45 pm

Nazi fried potatoes
Be warned you need to follow the directions to this recipe strictly
Take 1 lb of German Butter potatoes and cut them in pieces roughly approximately the volume of a 1" cube
You will insure the flesh is a lovely blond color, like the hair color of a beautiful Bavarian milkmaiden.
Place them in pot, cover them with pure cold spring water and bring them to a boil
Meanwhile, chop a small onion, 3 large cloves of garlic, 1 tbsp cilantro, 1 scallion or a green onion if you are an untermensch
Heat a large shallow german wok to a medium high temp and place sufficient heat tolerant vegetable oil, canola is acceptable
Fry the potatoes, turning them constantly until they start browning ( don't worry it doesn't make them impure, just taste better).
As it nears completion add the onions and soon after the cilantro and scallions, salt to taste
You will enjoy

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Re: Recipes

#27

Post by free thoughtpolice » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:02 pm

Lemon ginger pork/ chicken/ or beef:
-one lb. of roast beef, pork, or chicken
3 tbsp. pan drippings
2 tbsp oil
1/2 cup finely minced ginger
4 large cloves finely chopped garlic
2 tbsp. oyster sauce
2 tbsp soy sauce
3 tbsp lemon juice
3 tbsp flour

Place the oil in wok and heat to medium
Add the ginger, garlic and lemon, stir and cook for a few minutes
Add the flour, pan drippings, oyster sauce and soy sauce and mix well add enough water to thin to the right amount
Add the meat in smallish bits mix into the sauce well,cover and lower the heat to a simmer add h2o if necessary

Served on top of steamed rice and brussels sprouts with a shot of butter and soy sauce

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Re: Recipes

#28

Post by free thoughtpolice » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:36 pm

I forgot 2 tbsp. sriracha sauce added at the same time as the oyster sauce

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Re: Recipes

#29

Post by Keating » Tue Dec 11, 2018 4:35 pm

I'm planning an 8 course meal for my parents for New Years Day. I'm looking for a small fish course that isn't too fishy, as they aren't huge fish eaters. Anyone got good fish taster recipes?

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Re: Recipes

#30

Post by free thoughtpolice » Thu Dec 13, 2018 4:02 pm

Keating wrote: I'm planning an 8 course meal for my parents for New Years Day. I'm looking for a small fish course that isn't too fishy, as they aren't huge fish eaters. Anyone got good fish taster recipes?
An excellent fish for people that normally aren't keen on fish is Sablefish aka Black Cod. I'm not sure how available this would be in Oz but if you can get some give it a try. It is an extremely oily white fleshed fish available only in 1000 ft. or more deep cold water in the north east Pacific. Not fishy tasting, more like a subtle lobster taste, often described as buttery.
If you have a fish smoker or a BBQ that you can cool smoke with try this.
Glaze:
1/2 cup honey
1 tbsp. soy sauce
1/2 tsp paprika
Place skin down on grill brush with glaze keep smoke at 175F or 90C for 3 hours, glaze every hour.

If you don't have a smoker you can bake, broil, poach, grill or even sautee. Just cook until flesh turns from translucent to opaque and you are able to flake with a fork. It's easy to cook and doesn't need or seldom need oil as it has plenty of oil already, and doesn't require a lot spice or sauces. If you are going to BBQ you might want a fish cage or have a fine very clean grill.
Easiest recipe:
Skin down on parchment paper, brush with lemno butter (optional), season with salt and pepper, bake @ 400F for 15 minutes

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Re: Recipes

#31

Post by Keating » Sun Dec 16, 2018 7:38 pm

Thanks. I ended up going with chicken ravioli.

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Re: Recipes

#32

Post by free thoughtpolice » Sun Dec 16, 2018 7:52 pm

Keating wrote: Thanks. I ended up going with chicken ravioli.
:lol: As long as you go easy on the anchovies it shouldn't be too fishy. :drool:

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